Fly, fly higher farther… French poem professionally translated to English.

C’est magnifique!

ArtPoetry&Literature

Envol, plus haut plus loin... ©copyright2015owpp Envol, plus haut plus loin…
©copyright2015owpp

This poem was written after I had read Boileau’s “Oeuvres I Satires, le lutrin”. He was born in 1636 & today, belongs to the French classics. The only word that comes to my mind concerning his style is, magnificent. Discovering it at this time in my life gives me the advantage of grasping & appreciating the genius & depth of this master of literature.
This poem is mostly philosophising about the adventure & thrill of journeys in the mode of transportation we use today (which is mostly airplanes) & its origins.
I wrote this poem in French & as its level is higher than usual I preferred to get the help of a professional translator. I found it extremely difficult to keep its original flavour & twist which can sometimes get lost in search of a word or sentence in another language.
The work…

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About Léa

A wanderer who has found home in the South of France.
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20 Responses to Fly, fly higher farther… French poem professionally translated to English.

  1. Lea, beautiful poem I can only imagine it in French it would be even better.

    • Léa says:

      When I read it, I knew I had to share as it is so beautiful. The French, I must admit that I am still working on that…

  2. Thank you for reblogging my poem & linking it… I feel honored by your comment, my appreciation 🙂

    • Léa says:

      It is an honor to reblog this beautiful work. I shall add it to my collection of French poets. I started reading them since coming to France to help improve my French. 🙂

      • Wow! I’m at loss of words! (for once :)) Thank you 🙂

      • Léa says:

        The book that inspired the poem, is it available in English? I don’t think my French is good enough. Yes, your poem really moved me deeply and I am grateful. Léa

      • I have it in French but I am sure it can be found in English but never tried as I love reading in the language of origin. Did you try on Amazon Ebay or another online book seller?

      • Léa says:

        I shall look for it. I do prefer reading poetry in the original French. It has taught me much about the problems with translation. Unfortunately, my French has a long way to improve. 😉

      • Léa says:

        I’ve ordered in in French so my dictionary will be close by and my fingers crossed. You have inspired me. I do prefer the original despite the difficulty as many translations into English are appalling! 🙂

      • I know about translation problems bc I was busy for so long with this one! The moment you are dealing with a higher level language you are going to encounter difficulties translating it. You sometimes have to let go of the literal way in order not to lose its general meaning… so as to keep its “flavor”. Wishing you a load of luck, it might be challenging but it can give a euphoric feeling as you get results & feel your language going up a notch 🙂

      • Léa says:

        It is exciting to be able to get through the latest collection but I do keep the dictionary close by.
        There is a poet in Narbonne who I have been enjoying for several years. She had someone translate one of her books into Spanish and English. I don’t know Spanish but the English was appalling! I felt so bad for her. Two years ago, someone translated one of my poems, not at my request. I didn’t know about it until a few people told me they saw it in the local paper! What was published had my name on it but no resemblance to what I wrote. C’est la vie! I know the people, they thought they were being kind.

      • I hope I won’t have people distorting my work. It’s must be a nightmare for a writer… That is why I put in my “About” a copyright. I must say I learned a lot from this translating experience.

      • Léa says:

        This was a friend who teaches French but I don’t think that familiar with poetry. He thought he was doing me a favour… He meant no harm without a doubt.

      • I know what you mean, a large number of people (but not all!) mean well but don’t know how to get about it… they do things without asking & don’t realise that not every one is cut out of the same cloth. We are all individuals with different tastes & aspirations. The least would be to ask what the other desires before wasting time on their work as a surprise but not everyone is aware of that possibility!
        I worked with the professional translator TOGETHER for a very long time translating & she asked me question about why I had written this or that what msg did I intend to pass when I used that word. You could have called the translation a labor of love as much as the original creation of the poem!
        I have to admit that prior to that translation I had no idea it was preferable to do it that way, the reason it was done so was bc it was long distance & we thought it was easier to communicate directly & do it step by step.

      • I am honored that my words can have such effect on my readers! Thanks for letting me know, it means more than you know 🙂

      • Léa says:

        Where I came from, everyone is quick to tell others where they have gone wrong but when something is done well, silence as it is expected. I like people to know when they have done well and your poem is exceptional and I feel its message on many levels. Merci beaucoup! 🙂

      • It is so nice to hear someone else thinking as I do! I keep telling those close to me to let me know when things go well not only when they don’t & to compliment another (only when it’s a genuine observation obviously) not only jump on another to criticize… I think it’s an education or simple human tendency to be harsh on others because we mostly are perfectionists & so critical about ourselves too.
        I am very touched that you felt its msg on many levels. I felt many a time that my poems were not “absorbed” in the same way as I created them but now I see it’s not the case & I’m very grateful for that!

      • Léa says:

        I look forward to reading more of your work.

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