Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: Le petit prince

It would be lovely for me if the words to follow were my own. Of course they are not. However, I would like to share some of the beauty contained in the words of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. In addition, I would like to introduce you to the official website. I hope this taste whets your appetite for more.  http://www.thelittleprince.com/  Let this post be a reminder if you have read The Little Prince, perhaps it is time to revisit this heartwarming novella. If not, there is no time like the present.   “And at night you will look up at the stars.

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It’s too small, where I live, for me to show you where my stars is. It’s better that way. My star will just be one of the stars, for you. So you’ll like looking at all of them. They’ll all be your friends. And, besides, I am going to make you a present…’ He laughed again. ‘Ah, little prince, dear little prince! I love to hear that laughter!’ ‘That is my present. Just that. It will be as it was when we drank the water…’ ‘What do you mean?’ ‘People have stars, but they aren’t the same. For travelers, the stars are guides. For other people, they’re nothing but tiny lights. And for still others, for scholars, they’re problems. For my businessman, they were gold. But all those stars are silent stars. You, though, you’ll have stars like nobody else.’ ‘What do you mean?’ ‘When you look up at the sky at night, since I’ll be living on one of them, since I’ll be laughing on one of them, for you it’ll be as if all the stars are laughing. You’ll have stars that can laugh!’ And he laughed again. ‘And when you’re consoled (everyone eventually is consoled), you’ll be glad you’ve known me. You’ll always be my friend. You’ll feel like laughing with me. And you’ll open your window sometimes just for the fun of it…And your friends will be amazed to see you laughing while you’re looking up at the sky. Then you’ll tell them, “Yes, it’s the stars; they always make me laugh!” And they’ll think you’re crazy. It’ll be a nasty trick I played on you…’ And he laughed again. ‘And it’ll be as if I had given you, instead of stars, a lot of tiny bells that know how to laugh…’ And he laughed again.” ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

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Bisous, Léa

Un jour parfait

 

“The thing that is really hard, and really amazing, is giving up on being perfect and beginning the work of becoming yourself.”   –  Anna Quindlen

 

“To me, every hour of the day and night is an unspeakably perfect miracle.”  

–  Walt Whitman

 

“I wanted a perfect ending. Now I’ve learned, the hard way, that some poems don’t rhyme, and some stories don’t have a clear beginning, middle and end.”  

– Gilda Radner

 

 * 

 

Un jour parfait

 

J’adore

Chocolat noir

And red wine

Woodsmoke on

A frosty morning

The abundance of

Sourires et baisers

Dans mon environnement

Chestnuts roasting

Warm wooly hats and scarves

Un tasse de café

Warming icy hands

That simmering cauldron of soup

Which beckons me

As a day at the easel

Takes its toll

J’adore

Mozart and moonlight

Filtering throught

Ma fenêtre

Glistening reflections

On canvas

Un jour – bien utilisé

*

Bisous,

Léa

Material Witness

“Art is not a part of life, it is not an addition to life, it is the essence of those pieces of us that make us fulfilled. That give us hope. That give us dreams and provide the world a view very different than what it would have been without us.”

–  Hasan Davis

“Art opens the closets, airs out the cellars and attics. It brings healing.”   –  Julia Cameron

“I think artists can go to a level of vision that can often save us from a situation which seems to have no solution whatsoever.”   –  Susan Griffin

*

Material Witness

This is what I get

For attempting to reduce

The clutter in my life

This red plastic toolbox

Filled with long ignored

Pencils, charcoal, pastels

And other tricks of a trade

They were so foreign to

Me

Something I ached for

Yet knew nothing about

Flashbacks to childhood

A half-sisters art supplies

Tossed aside at the demands

Of her fiancée

Now these things

Were in plain site

Demanding attention

To be dealt with

To be used

To skate across paper

Or canvas

All the negative decrees of a

Lifetime want to be heard

Demand their say

Yet something deeper

Wants more

Dare I open the box?

Dare I see what will happen?

Learning to play

With art or anything else

Is more difficult as we age

But if it is given the smallest chance

It will prevail

The evidence is all around

Me

*

Bisous,

Léa

Re-post: Finding voice

This is a re-post of the first one to appear on this blog 11 December, 2011. My apologies to those who have already seen it.

“If you hear a voice within you say ‘you cannot paint,’ then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced.”   –  Vincent Van Gogh

“Never give up. And most importantly, be true to yourself. Write from your heart, in your own voice, and about what you believe in.”   –  Louise Brown

“I write for those women who do not speak, for those who do not have a voice because they were so terrified, because we are taught to respect fear more than ourselves. We’ve been taught that silence would save us, but it won’t.”  

–  Audre Lorde

 

Finding voice…

Be tells me to keep writing

Cait tells me to just write

My past tells me I can’t write

Fear writes for me

Anger writes the loudest, and is most prolific

Joy is silent, nearly invisible

Sadness drones on and on

Pain is sharp, isolated, and intense

Journals are scattered about my home

Tossed into the recesses of the car

They harbor numerous attempts of binge/purge

When moving I will devalue their loyalty

As I shove them through the shredder

The ghosts of childhood critique every effort

They silence me with threats to expose my failure

Deep inside the struggle

To break through the barriers

Quakes with revelatory thunder

Bisous,

Léa

Fight Censorship and thank a Librarian

“We are willing enough to praise freedom when she is tucked away in the past and cannot be a nuisance. In the present, amidst dangers whose outcome we cannot foresee, we get nervous about her, and admit censorship.   –  E.M. Forster

 

“Censorship is to art as lynching is to justice.”   –  Henry Louis Gates

 

“Submitting to censorship is to enter the seductive world of ‘The Giver’: the world where there are no bad words and no bad deeds. But it is also the world where choice has been taken away and reality distorted. And that is the most dangerous world of all.”   –  Lois Lowry

DO YOURSELF A FAVOUR AND READ:

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/statementspols/freedomreadstatement

*

Fight Censorship and thank a Librarian

It’s banned books week

And if a book hasn’t

Made it on that list

I’m not sure it is

Worth my time

Reading

*

It’s banned books week

If you care about

Making your own

Choices

If there is a book

You like that

Has made the list

Speak out

*

It’s banned books week

Somewhere there is a

Librarian who has stuck

Her neck out

For your right to

Read what you choose

They are the hero’s of

The hour

*

It’s banned books week

Celebrate

Read a book

From the list

Read the statement

Freedom to Read 1953

Celebrate

Then go to the independent

Book store and buy

Banned books

*

Bisous,

Léa

For Joseph

“Let us read and let us dance –two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.”    –  Voltaire

“The dance: a minimum of explanation, a minimum of anecdotes, and a maximum of sensations.”    –  Maurice Béjart

“Dance is the poetic baring of the soul through motion.”   –  Scott Nilson

For Joseph

The young dancer

Leaps and spins

Spurning gravity

As he re-defines it

Proud pirouette

Etched in crystal

Strong

Like the eye

Of a

Storm

Delicate

Like gold leaf

Clinging to the edge

Of a porcelain cup

Bisous,

Léa

peinture

“When my daughter was about seven years old, she asked me one day what I did at work. I told her I worked at the college – that my job was to teach people how to draw. She stared at me, incredulous, and said, “You mean they forget?”

– Howard Ikemoto

“Painting is just another way of keeping a diary.” – Pablo Picasso

“Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter.”

– Oscar Wilde

***

peinture

canvas

neither blank

nor barren

elle est un taquinerie

knowing how

i must spread, smear and spackle

her porous skin

as vast

as the mind can explore

just beyond this

mortal’s reach

creamy, thick, luxurious

stories to be told and

lies with which

i seal

her fate

***

bisous,

léa

Pied fâchés

Instead of the usual quotes, today’s blog is to give a nod to the delightfully creative woman, Sandy Ackers. This is the second poem I have posted that came directly from one of her creative inspirations. You don’t need to have writer’s block to benefit from her “creative bursts”. Just accept the challenge and enjoy the ride. You can find Sandy at Strangling My Muse or http://stranglingmymuse.wordpress.com  Come play in the sandbox!

Pied fâchés

Once again

Came the argument

First there were

The whimpering

Complaints

But as always

They grew louder

You hate that

I have imprisoned

You

In those heavy boots

Thick socks

As we walk

The beautiful hills

That surrounds us

You don’t believe

I do it to protect you

From all the stones

And other detritus

You beg and plead

For sandals

Or total exposure

As always

I make sweet promises

To coax you onward

Afternoon

Having your way with

warm sand

seductively massaging

Prelude to full pardon

Revival at

Sea

Bisous,

Léa

Meditations on Friendship

“In everyone’s life, at some time, our inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner spirit.”
– Albert Schweitzer

Written after being invited in for tea at Rita’s …

She lives her days and nights in the cooler part of town

Coaxing life out of clay, fabric and wood

Her long flowing robes announce she will not cave in

To the demands of fashion

Better homes and gardens do not call for a photo shoot

Too many books, movies, cd’s and collections

Too many bits and pieces waiting to be conscripted

Into her next masterpiece

We all have but a few precious days in this incarnation

She chooses differently than many

Did I tell you she is wise?

Travel is her opium and she will have it

Feeding her habit in far away lands

She knows the beauty of each different face

Raising the chalice of adventure and drinking her fill

I sing delirious from the exposure

Her mantra – the eternal YES!

French café beat, the rhythm thunders through her

A meditation in dance

Bisous,

Léa

Parc Guëll – Barcelona Spain

Furniture by Gaudi

“The creation continues incessantly through the media of man.” Antonio Gaudi

Since my other blog is strictly about France, this gives me an opportunity to showcase some of the other places I’ve been. Besides, I have too many photos not to display somewhere. The most difficult part of this is deciding which from hundreds of pictures to include.

This popular park started out as a development project. Eusebi Guëll, Catalan industrialist, aquired a 42 acre plot north of Barcelona. His vision was to turn the area into a residential  village with English styled gardens.

In 1900 Guëll commissioned Antoni Gaudí with the development of the project. With the support from other architects including Josep M. Jujol and his disciple Francesc Berenguer, Gaudí worked on the garden village. By 1914 it had become clear that the project was a commercial failure and Guëll failed to sell even one single property. In 1918, the property was acquired by the city and became a public park.

Gaudi Museum
From 1906 and 1926, Gaudí lived in one of the two houses that were completed. The house, known as the Casa Museu Gaudí, was designed by Francesc Berenguer. Now a museum it displays some of Gaudí’s furniture which includes some from the Casa Batlló and drawings. The park also includes the Casa Trias, which is not open for visitors, and winding roads with paths supported by tree-like columns.

Gaudi Museum

Serpentine Bench or the Gran Placa: A  Circular flight of stairs leads to another famous feature of the park: the Gran Placa Circular. The plaza that was created here was conceived as a market place. The Serpentine Bench, which borders the plaza is the largest bench in the world. Its colorful ceramic tiles with more than 80 columns  snake and curl around the place. From the Gran Placa and the terraced gardens above, you are are granted a spectacular view of the Mediterranean.

Bisous,

Léa

Serpentine Bench and the Gran Placa