La Fête du Muguet

Due to WordPress issues, this site (http://foundinfrance) is currently in hiatus and its fate undecided as of yet.Therefore, I have reblogged it onto the poetry blog. However, you are most welcome to visit this other site, https://poetryphotosandmusingsohmy.wordpress.com
As you may notice this a reblog from the past but relevant. Both have been active since 2011 and many posts to choose from. Thank you.

found-in-france

La Fête du Muguet, La Fête du Travail, May Day in France is a public holiday to campaign for and celebrate workers’ rights. It is also an occasion to present  Muguet, lily-of-the-valley, or dog rose flowers to loved ones. Often it is just a single sprig of Muguet with a few leaves. However, some will incorporate a rose or even add several sprigs of Muguet to a much larger arrangement or plant.

How is the day celebrated: People across France give bouquets (or a single sprig) to their loved ones. In some areas, families will get up early to go into the woods to pick the flowers. Labor organizations will sell the flowers on the streets on May 1. Special regulations enable individuals and some groups to sell the flowers on May 1 without complying with retail regulations or paying a tax.

Parades and demonstrations to campaign for the rights…

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Wednesday’s words to ponder…

“Any person of honor chooses rather to lose his honor than to lose his conscience.”  – Michel de Montaigne  

“The public weal requires that men should betray, and lie, and massacre; let us leave this commission to men who are more obedient and more supple.”                      – Michel de Montaigne

Michel de Montaigne was an influential and key figure of the French Renaissance. The father of modern skepticism is best known for his essays which are among the best ever composed. Furthermore, it is he who is credited with establishing the essay as a recognized genre in literature and was the first to use the word essay when speaking of his writings. Among the most famous writers influenced by the essays of Montaigne were Isaac Asmiov, René Decartes and William Shakespeare.

Bisous,

Léa

Well done David!

Just to let people who may be interested know, I have my first novel on Amazon, printed and Kindle versions. Having waited in vain for agents to even acknowledge my e-mails, I have decided to self-publish because I would like people to READ it. It’s called Zazou and Rebecca, and is set in Southern France, […]

via A bit of self-publicity… — belovedalder

Bleu

IMG_0340
Armand in his atelier
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Le croix de Cathar

Bleu

Cobalt

As the tiny rivers

Winding beneath

Papery thin skin

I watch as they have slowed

But remember their faster pace                                                    

DSCN2043
Armand et Auguste

Cerulean

As the plastic cannula

From oxygen tank

To your nasal orifice 

Easing each breath

Your hands reach for me

Offering each cheek to be kissed

Royal

As the dancer

In the flames

As you welded and forged

Iron and steel into magnificent forms

Gates, railings but also art

A band of musicians

Prominent upon your mantel

My own, croix de Cathar

A gift like your friendship

Armand

Bleu shall forever

Be the colour of you

Increasingly fragile

As you reach out for Auguste

The great-grandson who shares

Your sparkle from cobalt eyes  

Bisous,

Léa

And the result is in…

 

 

LA CHATTE NOIR
LA CHATTE NOIRE

Several weeks ago, I asked for your help in finding a name for my business. There were several wonderful submissions. With the help of some very special trusted friends, and a few of the feline variety, the struggle has come to an end. However, that was not before spending hours trying out the suggestions, a few of my own and variations of them all. On 10 June as I drove away from the lovely beach village of Leucate after my weekly French class, a title popped into my head. There has been some criticism as the famous Black Cat painted by the late Henri Toulouse Lautrec was Le Chat Noir. Yes, I do love that cat. However, I am a female and what I write, publish, paint, photograph… is with a feminine perspective and I desire that the name reflect that. Ergo, I present to you for the first time, LA CHATTE NOIRE PRESSE.

LA CHATTE NOIRE PRESSE can also be found on my LinkedIn page.

My sincere thanks to all who participated and all who lent their support. Thank you to my friend Natalje who hashed it out with me last night and gave me valuable feedback and aided me in realising this is what I had been searching for.

 

Bisous et calins,

Léa

 

 

Contest: Help name…

As some of you know, I have been writing/publishing two blogs for the past two and a half years: http://foundinfrance@wordpress.com and https://poetryphotosandmusingsohmy.wordpress.com

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What most of you are not aware of, I have previously published two collections of poetry and have two more in the works (early stages). In addition, I have recently begun my first novel.

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At this time, I would like to find a fitting name for my business. So far, a few ideas have come up:

*Lavender Press

*Press de Tournesol/Sunflower Press

*Corbières (something) Press or (something) Corbières Press

The Corbières is the heart of the wine region where I live and where my heart found a home. Did I mention I love our local red wines? If you follow Found in France, or visit, you will have seen a number of posts from this region with photos. It should reflect the area, the work or both. The selected name will relate to the work I do and my love of France and/or my location. If you are familiar with Poetry photos and musings oh my, you will have some information about some of my other work. SUBMISSIONS NEED NOT BE IN FRENCH.

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While I have no prize to offer at this time, my dear friend Christine reminds me, “if people only want to offer suggestions if there is a prize then I say those offerings aren’t worthy!” It will earn my gratitude and mention on the blogs and can include the link to your own blog.

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For real inspiration, visit Christine at: http://journeyintopoetry.wordpress.com and Carly Jay at: http://bruisesyoucantouch.com

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Bisous,

Léa

 

 

Sachant j’appartiens (Knowing I belong)

“Home is not where you live but where they understand you.”

–  Christian Morgenstern

“You need a village, if only for the pleasure of leaving it. A village means that you are not alone, knowing that in the people, the trees, the earth, there is something  that belongs to you, waiting for you when you are not there.”   –  Casare Pavese

Sachant j’appartiens

Joyeux anniversaire

Yes! Today is the day

Anniversaire

Of my birth

Or re-birth

For those who

Cannot comprehend

When LIVING

Began

Yes. There were

All those decades

In captivity

Ces états fracturée appelé

Amérique

It may work for some

But my internal compass

My north star

Was always Europe

Arriving in France

Pieces became accessible

The puzzle came together

Coming home

Knowing it was home

Before ever arriving

Mon village dans

Le Corbières

Depuis ce premier jour Jeanne prend mon bras,

Guiding my way

The welcome mat

Was waiting

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Bisous,

Léa

Nothing like Paris

“In France we have a saying, “Joie de vivre,’ which actually doesn’t exist in the English language. It means looking at your life as something that is to be taken with great pleasure and enjoy it.”   –  Mireille Guiliano

“When I was a child and they burned me out of my home, I was frightened and I ran away. Eventually I ran far away. It was to a place called France. Many of you have been there, and many have not. But I must tell you, ladies and gentlemen, in that country I never feared. It was like a fairyland place.”   –  Josephine Baker

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Nothing like Paris

There is nothing

Like Paris

But the explosion

Red on purple

On gold

Sunsets along

The bastide

Of Saint Malo

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Nothing is

Like Paris

Save the winding

River

Tower Bridge

de Cahors

le diable

Watches us

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There is nothing

Like Paris

Unless you visit

Narbonne

Soak up the sun

Near Place de ville

Reach out and

Touch or

Walk upon

Via Domita

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Nothing is like

Paris

Yet

Collioure’s jewels

Dazzled Cézanne,

Picasso, and now me

Precious stone colors

Hover at the foot

Of the Pyrenees

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Nothing is like

Paris

Each of

France’s treasures

Priceless jewels

And must be

Explored, discovered

Its riches

Precious

As you find them

Leave the guidebook

Then you must

Open your eyes,

Your mind and your

Heart

Your reward to find

La belle

France

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Bisous,

Léa

Cours français

“No man can be a good teacher unless he has feelings of warm affection toward his pupils and a genuine desire to impart to them what he believes to be of value.” – Bertrand Russell

Cours français

Serge

Serge’s eyes twinkle

As he drills us

Conjugating

Je donne

Tu donne

Il donne

Nous donnons

And on

He gives

We receive

His love of teaching

His love of Country

Of words

Bisous,

Léa

Cézanne, Art & Poetry

It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.
Antoine de Saint-Exupery

When I judge art, I take my painting and put it next to a God made object like a tree or flower. If it clashes, it is not art.
Paul Cézanne

Fete de Cézanne

While visiting Aix-en-Provence in 2006, I had the good fortune to arrive at the beginning of fête de Cézanne. Paul Cézanne 1839 – 1906, a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter. His work was instrumental in bridging the transition from 19th century Impressionism and 20th century’s line of enquiry, Cubism.

Born in the town of Aix-en-Provence, he had a fondness for painting Mont Sainte-Victoire. He left over 60 paintings of the mountain. His studio remains as he left it. Now owned by the University, it is maintained as if he just stepped out. Even the basket of ripening apples is kept so that there is fruit in each stage and the aroma permeates the room. Over a hundred years since his death and his spirit lingers large. The grounds that surround the studio are a maze of paths dotted with work by students. I must admit to visiting more than once and it remains one of my two favorite places I have visited since first visiting France. While I do appreciate the policy of no cameras inside the studio, I do wish I had photos of it to share. You will just have to visit it yourself!

Upon returning to California from the first visit, I was approached by my friend Carol. Carol, an artist, was putting together a limited edition art book with a grant from the Art’s Council. As we talked, she asked me about art & France. I told her that “art is the loom the tapestry we know as France is woven upon.” She asked if she could quote me. Bien sur! (of course) Then she told me that she would require a poem from me that would speak of art & France. That was what brought about the writing of the poem below.
Dans le jardin de Cézanne
Meditations on Visiting Atelier Cézanne

One hundred years
After his death
The doors to his shrine
Open to the masses
I but a privileged pilgrim
A witness – I inhale deeply
The plethora of scent
Aging fruits
A wicker basket
Darkened by harvests of the past

A long shelf balanced
Across the western wall
Dusquenoy’s cupid keeps company
With the three skulls of death
Enlightenment radiates
From the northern exposure
A burst of light
Color spreads wantonly
I am humbled in each direction

Le choeur fantôme
Intones hymns of praise
Peaches, apples and pears
Whisper of fields they have known
An old apple dreams of freshness
Home is Aix-en-Provence
Sainte-Victorie
He paints their secrets
With celestial vision
And transparency

Since moving to France, I have returned to visit Atelier Cézanne and was just as moved as my first visit. Having spent six weeks exploring France on my first visit and living here for over four years, I continue to be delighted at every turn. However, I must admit that to date, my favorite places are Montmartre and Atelier Cézanne. There is no doubt that I shall return again and again.

Bisous,

Léa