THE MOON, 3 POEMS — Deuxiemepeau Poetry by Damien B. Donnelly

1 The Depth under the Moon Moonlight melts languidly on liquid lakes like suds on dishes like snow on windows like thicker skin over age-old scars. Moonlight floats momentarily on rippling reflections like the tingle after kisses like the scent after sex like the pain after parting. Moonlight flirts on the water to divine […]

via THE MOON, 3 POEMS — Deuxiemepeau Poetry by Damien B. Donnelly

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The Ukrainian Muse and the Paradox of Life

If you are not yet familiar with Randal’s work, you are missing so much.

Global Sojourns Photography

Alone I walk.  The bite of the winter chill does not let up, colors of the world fade into different shades of bleakness.  The ache for youth pulsates strong although I’m acutely aware each passing second takes me further away from this dream.

A nondescript voice echoes in my head, “the closer to death you are, the closer to life you become…”

My turned-up collar does little to stifle the cold wind caressing my neck, motivation for the continued search of a spark to ignite another year of passion.

The winter’s silence is broken by a warm whisper, “so you’ve finally come to see me again…” I look to find a smile I’ve grown accustomed to when in a philosophical mood.  She’s always walking beside me, but it’s been too long since I last heard her voice.

“This morning, I noticed you were preoccupied with a quote at the coffee…

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Wednesday’s Words to Ponder

“Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt 

“Justice cannot be for one side, but for both”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

“You must do things that you think you cannot do”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

               “Never allow someone who is not allowed to say yes, to say no to you”.                           – Eleanor Roosevelt

“When will our conscience become so tender that we will act to prevent human misery rather than avenge it”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

      “I once had a rose named after me and I was flattered. But I was not happy to read the description in the catalog: not good in a bed, but up against the wall”.                     – Eleanor Roosevelt

“A woman is like a tea bag –  you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt was born on October 11, 1884, in New York City. The niece of Theodore. Roosevelt, who would become president and who married a man who also became president, Franklin D. Roosevelt. Eleanor took on the role of the first lady and made it her own. She wrote her own newspaper column, My Day, advocated for human rights and women’s rights. She held press conferences and after the death of her husband went on to chair the United Nation’s Human Rights Commission.

 

Despite being married to the president, she was not content to sit back idly and smile for the camera. She developed her own public voice while working with the American Red Cross. Eleanor accepted increasing challenges following her husband’s polio attack that would render him dependant on physical assistance for the remainder of his days.

 

As her husband took on the mantle of command of a nation, she forever changed the role of a first lady. refusing to be relegated to a life of domesticity, she gave press conferences and rallied people for causes that she held worthwhile. Among the causes she campaigned for were human rights, children’s causes and issues relating to women. She worked tirelessly with the League of Women Voters. She focused on ways to alleviate the suffering of the poor and against racial discrimination. During WWII she traveled abroad in support of American troops. She continued this role until her husband’s death on April 12, 1945.

 

Despite her plans to fade away from public life, that was not to be. In 1945, then President Harry Truman appointed her delegate to the United Nations General Assembly which she served until 1953 when she became chairperson for the U.N.’s Human Rights Commission helping to create the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, an endeavor she considered to be her highest achievement in a remarkable life.

 

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy reappointed her to the United States delegation to the U.N. and to the National Advisory Committee of the Peace Corps and chair on the President’s Commission on the Status of Women.

 

On November 7, 1962, Eleanor Roosevelt died in NYC of aplastic anemia, tuberculosis and heart failure. She was 78 years old and was laid to rest on the family estate in Hyde Park, NY.

 

Eleanor Roosevelt set a standard for First Lady that has not been equaled. She was a humanitarian of the first order and dedicated her life to fighting for social and political change and committed to bringing the issues that would affect them, to the people.

Bisous,

Léa

Quotes that deserve to be shared, again and again…

For those willing to pick up the gauntlet, choose at least one quote, read it out loud and then write where it leads you.  Share it if you wish.

 

“He who establishes his argument by noise and command, shows that his reason is weak.” – Michel de Montaigne

 

“Every movement reveals us.”  – Michel de Montaigne

 

“Why do people respect the package rather than the man?”  – Michel de Montaigne

 

“Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.”  – Franz Kafka

 

“Remember then: there is only one time that is important — NOW! It is the most important time because it is the only time we have any power.” – Leo Tolstoy

 

“Wrong does not cease to be wrong because the majority share in it.” – Leo Tolstoy

 

“If you look for perfection, you’ll never be content.” – Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

 

“When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all dunces are in a confederacy against him.”  – Jonathan Swift

 

“Vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others.”  – Jonathan Swift

 

“Laws are like cobwebs, which may catch small flies, but let wasps and hornets break through,”  – Jonathan Swift

 

Bisous,

Léa

 

What To Write About When The Dreaded Deadline Is Looming – by Derek Haines… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

on Just Publishing Advice: You have to write an article or blog post, and the clock is ticking Every writer knows the feeling. You need to write about something, and quickly, but you are at a loss for topic ideas. For authors and those writers who are into more creative writing pursuits, there is usually […]

via What To Write About When The Dreaded Deadline Is Looming – by Derek Haines… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

When you are not writing…

by Diane Laney Fitzpatrick I know, it sounds like a lame excuse, doesn’t it? “It’s not that I’m not writing. It’s just that I’m thinking about my next chapter while I play this game of Solitaire on my phone. With Law and Order reruns playing in the background.” Those of us who have […]

via How Not Writing Can Help Your Writing — A Writer’s Path

Endings, beginnings …

For those of you who have not yet met Carly Jay, meet the most courageous person I have ever known.

bruises you can touch

A few months ago, I was driving to see a client, and as I always do when I’m on the Inner City Bypass, I quickly looked to my left where the Royal Children’s Hospital is. Or I should say, was. When I’d finished my shift, I drove back to the Royal, parked my car and got as close as I could to the site. I cried big, ugly tears, and had to take some deep breaths to ground myself. I took some photos and spoke to one of the traffic guys about my time in there.

Going back was not about burying my suffering. It was about bearing witness to the destruction of what had been my second home. That might sound hyperbolic, but it’s where I did half my growing up. It’s hard for people to grasp that I spent nearly half my life in hospital before I had my transplant…

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