Contempt

“The only cure for contempt is counter-contempt.” – H.L. Mencken

“Only the contemptible fear contempt.” – François de La Rochefoucauld

 “I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness because it shows me the stars.” – Og Mandino

 

Contempt

 

Swaddled at birth

In that shroud of contempt

I could not escape

With time and healing

It has become

A badge of honor

Acceptance had a high price

Selling out my mind and soul

Was never on the table

What was lost

Never belonged to me

I walk alone, never lonely

With self-acceptance there is

Always a trusted companion

At my side till the end

Contempt has no place in my life

Only pity for those who chose its path

 

Bisous,

Léa

 

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Wednesday’s Words to Ponder

“Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt 

“Justice cannot be for one side, but for both”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

“You must do things that you think you cannot do”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

               “Never allow someone who is not allowed to say yes, to say no to you”.                           – Eleanor Roosevelt

“When will our conscience become so tender that we will act to prevent human misery rather than avenge it”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

      “I once had a rose named after me and I was flattered. But I was not happy to read the description in the catalog: not good in a bed, but up against the wall”.                     – Eleanor Roosevelt

“A woman is like a tea bag –  you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water”.  – Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt was born on October 11, 1884, in New York City. The niece of Theodore. Roosevelt, who would become president and who married a man who also became president, Franklin D. Roosevelt. Eleanor took on the role of the first lady and made it her own. She wrote her own newspaper column, My Day, advocated for human rights and women’s rights. She held press conferences and after the death of her husband went on to chair the United Nation’s Human Rights Commission.

 

Despite being married to the president, she was not content to sit back idly and smile for the camera. She developed her own public voice while working with the American Red Cross. Eleanor accepted increasing challenges following her husband’s polio attack that would render him dependant on physical assistance for the remainder of his days.

 

As her husband took on the mantle of command of a nation, she forever changed the role of a first lady. refusing to be relegated to a life of domesticity, she gave press conferences and rallied people for causes that she held worthwhile. Among the causes she campaigned for were human rights, children’s causes and issues relating to women. She worked tirelessly with the League of Women Voters. She focused on ways to alleviate the suffering of the poor and against racial discrimination. During WWII she traveled abroad in support of American troops. She continued this role until her husband’s death on April 12, 1945.

 

Despite her plans to fade away from public life, that was not to be. In 1945, then President Harry Truman appointed her delegate to the United Nations General Assembly which she served until 1953 when she became chairperson for the U.N.’s Human Rights Commission helping to create the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, an endeavor she considered to be her highest achievement in a remarkable life.

 

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy reappointed her to the United States delegation to the U.N. and to the National Advisory Committee of the Peace Corps and chair on the President’s Commission on the Status of Women.

 

On November 7, 1962, Eleanor Roosevelt died in NYC of aplastic anemia, tuberculosis and heart failure. She was 78 years old and was laid to rest on the family estate in Hyde Park, NY.

 

Eleanor Roosevelt set a standard for First Lady that has not been equaled. She was a humanitarian of the first order and dedicated her life to fighting for social and political change and committed to bringing the issues that would affect them, to the people.

Bisous,

Léa

Wednesday’s Words to Ponder

“An arrogant person considers himself perfect. It is the main prejudice of arrogance. This hinders the main task of a person in life – become a better person.” – Leo Tolstoy

“Everyone is thinking about changing the world, but no one is thinking of changing.” – Leo Tolstoy

“Patriotism in its simplest, clearest, and most indubitable meaning is nothing but an instrument for the attainment of the government’s ambitious and mercenary aims, and a renunciation of human dignity, common sense, and conscience by the governed, and a slavish submission to those who hold power. That is what is really preached wherever patriotism is championed. Patriotism is slavery.”    – Leo Tolstoy

Born Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy in Tula Province, Russia 1828 – 1910

Leo Tolstoy was an exceptionally gifted writer. Among his most famous works are War and Peace (1869), Anna Karenina (1877). His novels and short stories offer a window into the lives of the Russian people during the reign of the tsars. War and Peace remains one of his greatest novels and took ten years to complete. With an eye on realism and historical accuracy he paints a vivid picture of the social classes during the Russian invasion of the troops of Napoleon in 1812.

 

Bisous,

Léa

Quotes that deserve to be shared, again and again…

For those willing to pick up the gauntlet, choose at least one quote, read it out loud and then write where it leads you.  Share it if you wish.

 

“He who establishes his argument by noise and command, shows that his reason is weak.” – Michel de Montaigne

 

“Every movement reveals us.”  – Michel de Montaigne

 

“Why do people respect the package rather than the man?”  – Michel de Montaigne

 

“Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.”  – Franz Kafka

 

“Remember then: there is only one time that is important — NOW! It is the most important time because it is the only time we have any power.” – Leo Tolstoy

 

“Wrong does not cease to be wrong because the majority share in it.” – Leo Tolstoy

 

“If you look for perfection, you’ll never be content.” – Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

 

“When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all dunces are in a confederacy against him.”  – Jonathan Swift

 

“Vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others.”  – Jonathan Swift

 

“Laws are like cobwebs, which may catch small flies, but let wasps and hornets break through,”  – Jonathan Swift

 

Bisous,

Léa

 

Wednesday’s words to ponder…

“Any person of honor chooses rather to lose his honor than to lose his conscience.”  – Michel de Montaigne  

“The public weal requires that men should betray, and lie, and massacre; let us leave this commission to men who are more obedient and more supple.”                      – Michel de Montaigne

Michel de Montaigne was an influential and key figure of the French Renaissance. The father of modern skepticism is best known for his essays which are among the best ever composed. Furthermore, it is he who is credited with establishing the essay as a recognized genre in literature and was the first to use the word essay when speaking of his writings. Among the most famous writers influenced by the essays of Montaigne were Isaac Asmiov, René Decartes and William Shakespeare.

Bisous,

Léa

L’amour – Creed of Greed

Once again, a challenge from friends at fandango: https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/79388113/posts/1958222579  This may not have been the intended response but where the muse directed. 

“It is the logic of consumerism that undermines the values of loyalty and permanence and promotes a different set of values that is destructive of family life.” – Christopher Lasch

“If we understand the mechanism and motives of the group mind, it is now possible to control and regiment the masses according to our will without them knowing it.”                                                             – Edward Bernays

 

 

L’amour – Creed of greed (Love for sale)

A fortunate few
Born to this estate
Others spend their lives
On the quest

Many will promise it
If you wear their clothes
Buy their perfume, make-up
Nothing to do with who you are
That inadequate lump of clay

Corporations take you to the fountain
Where love is hidden
Yet I warn you
It is beyond their reach
Cannot find what they don’t comprehend

Consumerism is a lethal cliff
Closer and closer to the edge
You buy, buy, buy
The next item will complete you
Financing the creed of greed
It will bring you down.

Bisous,
Léa

Dear Mother Earth 2018 — Annas Art – FärgaregårdsAnna

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.”  –  George Bernard Shaw

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”  – Margaret Mead

 

I am so sorry you have to experience anthropocene. Since I wrote to you in 2016 it feels like we humans haven’t done a single thing to make the anthropocene an anastrophe (opposite of catastrophe). I’m sorry for your melting glaciers, your burning forests, the tsunamis and all asphalt and concrete we humans smothering your […]

via Dear Mother Earth 2018 — Annas Art – FärgaregårdsAnna