Barbarians — Dark Matter

I’m not worried about the long run with these barbarians. They give off the whiff, the white heat of desperate knowledge. They know they’re done. It may take twenty or thirty years, hundreds or thousands of dead for that to come to completion. It won’t be pretty, but it is inevitable. We know it too. We understand […]

via Barbarians — Dark Matter

The Soldiers’ Pocket Books That Legitimized Paperbacks

Nicholas C. Rossis

Even though pamphlets and softcover books have been available in Europe since the 16th century, US readers looked down on them until well into the 20th century. As a recent Atlas Obscura post by Cara Giaimo explains, without a mass-market distribution model in place, it was difficult to make money selling inexpensive books.

Although certain brands succeeded by partnering with department stores, individual booksellers preferred to stock their shops with sturdier, better-looking hardbacks, for which they could charge higher prices. Even those who were trying to change the public’s mind bought into this prejudice: one paperback series, Modern Age Books, disguised its offerings as hardcovers, adding dust jackets and protective cardboard sleeves. They, too, couldn’t hack it in the market, and the company folded in the 1940s.

Wartime Reading

Armed Services Editions | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Soldiers in Virginia wrangle with hardcover books donated through the VBC. Image via Atlas Obscura.

Then, war came. In September of…

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Democracy… no, sadly it is not.

Thank you Sally for your courage. There are very few words here that I haven’t said myself, not that anyone was listening. My only disagreement would be on the views of Western Europe regarding the American Image. I’ve been living the past decade in Western Europe and find that the image is faded, tattered and torn. For those sitting on the fence, drop what you are doing and do yourself a favor. Start by reading The People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn.

Why I have Always Hated Independence Day (July 4th) in the USA I am not the only one, either. Fireworks I could enjoy the fireworks from a great distance and up high, only. Sometimes I could get to my own or someone else’s rooftop or high window and watch from afar and admire the colors […]

via Why I have Always Hated Independence Day in the USA — Sally Ember, Ed.D.

Division

“The nationalist not only does not disapprove of atrocities committed by his own side, but he has a remarkable capacity for not even hearing about them.”                      – George Orwell

“One who deceives will always find those who allow themselves to be deceived.”       – Niccolo Machiavelli

Division

An adage I heard often

As a little girl

The bigger they are

The harder they…

Beyond cracked,or tectonics

Seams rival Grand Canyon

Each day new fissures appear

America, broken the

Faults emerging everywhere

Targeting everyone, who

Isn’t part of the problem

There is no unity

States could not be

More divided

Your moral compass sank

Can the ship be far behind?

You cannot make

America great again,

By subjugation, violence

Hatred is the the brand name

We know who is selling it

 

 

Bisous,  

 

Léa

Mind’s eye

Originally posted on 31 December 2011

“Wars are poor chisels for carving out peaceful tomorrows.”  – Martin Luther King Jr.

“The first casualty when war comes is truth.”  –  Hiram Johnson

 

Mind’s eye

My father fought

A war

Years before

My birth

As I grew up

I watched him

Fight it

Again and again

His sinewy hands

Trembled

As he pried apart

Venetian blinds

Scouting the enemy invasion

Of our suburban neighborhood

Armed with a bottle of juice

A newspaper

Or any other munitions

At hand

He held his ground

Paralyzed

By his reality

Bisous,

Léa

When the eagle lands: Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa

“History with all her volumes vast, hath but one page.”   – Lord Byron

 

“Is it only in the army in the Philippines that Americans sometimes commit deeds that cause all other Americans to regret?” – Theodore Roosevelt

 

“As long as the world shall last there will be wrongs, and if no man objected and no man rebelled, those wrongs would last forever.” – Clarence Darrow

 

Da Nang March 2002
Da Nang March 2002

 

When the eagle lands: Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa

 

Despite luggage filled

With packages of raisins

Jars of peanut butter

And other edibles as

Directed by Huyen

I felt as the guest who

Shows up for the feast

Empty handed – on arrival

In Da Nang

Despite numerous trips to

Tijuana in my youth

This traveler was not

Prepared for the depth

Of poverty – starvation,

Suffering at every turn

It was easy to spot

Hidden behind toothless grins

The kind gentle hands

Welcoming this foreigner

Whose generous form was

Warmly and securely enveloped in

Skeletal arms – for those still able

Fragile, contorted bodies in

Wheel chairs or makeshift

Gurneys – smile with what is

Left to them – perhaps the light

Radiating from their eyes

Their parents exposed to

Agent orange – a gift

In their own best interest

Bestowed by America,

Monsanto and Dow Chemical

The same Monsanto producing

Between 70% – 100% of all

Genetically Modified seeds

Declare war on life itself

Flashbacks of mutilated bodies

Float into my periphery

As the chemical giants

Tally ill gotten gains – where

Will they strike next?

MARS, GENERAL MILLS,

KRAFT, NESTLE, PEPSICO,

KELLOGG’S, COCA COLA

UNILEVER – make up to

90% of food at your

Neighborhood grocery retailer

Under the auspices of your

Elected officials – whose pockets

Deeply lined from corporate coffers

Sociopath ideology; no empathy, no remorse, no guilt, no shame

The masses complain and complain

Yet fail to alter consumptive practices

One month, we walked the streets

Of Da Nang – handing out sacks of

Rice and other foodstuff

Twelve years later

Yet I still feel like screaming

Alone into my pillow

“Out, damned spot! Out, I say

*

Peace

Léa

Victory in Europe

Victory in Europe

No

I was not

Even a gleam

In my father’s eye

As he marched into

Paris

Teeth clenched

Jaw drawn tight

It was years

Before

*

Yet today

I stood with

My village

And thought of

Him

And others

I would never

Know

*

Many laid down

Their lives

Others carried their

Scars back home

Like my father’s

A war he never

stopped fighting

Not all scars

Can be seen

*

Another war

Many years before

Both grandfathers

Trod this precious soil

Though they never knew

Each other

Both went home

With damaged lungs

TB and the other

Mustard gas

*

One I was never

To meet

Yet today

As Europe

Honours those

Who sacrificed

I stood with my village

In the land they fought for

The land that I love

And remembered

Them

*

Bisous,

Léa

Mind’s eye

“The first casualty when war comes is truth.”

-Hiram Johnson

Mind’s eye

My father fought

A war

Years before

My birth

As I grew up

I watched him

Fight it

Again and again

His sinewy hands

Trembled

As he pried apart

Venetian blinds

Scouting the enemy invasion

Of our suburban neighborhood

Armed with a bottle of juice

A newspaper

Or any other munitions

At hand

He held his ground

Paralyzed

By his reality

 

Bisous,

– Léa