How To Be A Bestselling Author in 3 Days or Less — Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Originally posted on yadadarcyyada: There’s a lot of noise out there about how to write a bestseller. Why don’t we break it down. Let’s simplify the process and get you to bestseller status in 3 days or less! 1. Write a book. Use as many words as you think you need. Plots are plots (it’s…

via How To Be A Bestselling Author in 3 Days or Less — Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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Forget the Muse

The best cure for Writer’s Block is to write. Stephen King’s book on writing is one of my favorites. Also, Writing Down The Bones by Natalie Goldberg and Bird By Bird by Ann Lamott. Muscles atrophy when we don’t use them so it only stands to reason that writing does not improve without practice, daily.

A Writer's Path

by Michael Mohr

Today I wanted to talk about the process and act of writing. What I mean by that is the simple craft of regularly putting pen to paper. As Stephen King famously said, “Amateurs wait for the muse to come. The rest of us get working.” That is so incredibly true. When I was a creative writing undergrad at San Francisco State University, like many young [writing] students, I thought that, when the ‘muse’ came, I could then write the Great American Novel.

The truth is—any professional can affirm this—and I hate to break your heart here: There is no muse. The muse is like Santa Clause; it’s a hoax that we tell beginners to try and inspire them. Now, there’s nothing inherently wrong with that. But at some point, if you take yourself seriously as a writer, you will have to let go of the Santa Clause…

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10 Popular Misconceptions About Writers — Jessie Bingham

People thinks and say such silly things sometimes, we’re all guilty of it. But here are ten common misconceptions the rest of the world has about writers.

via 10 Popular Misconceptions About Writers — Jessie Bingham

What It Takes To Be A Serious Writer — Have We Had Help?

In the good old bad old days, wrongly or rightly, writers were shielded by their agents and publishers from their reading public to maintain an air of mystery, and to shield them from the more repugnant elements of society, among other things. These days since the internet became reality, it has become a necessary tool […]

via What It Takes To Be A Serious Writer — Have We Had Help?

If We Were Having Coffee & Talking About Writing… #SundayBlogShare #AmWriting — BlondeWriteMore

Bit of a mixed bag this week, so I thought I would imagine us having a coffee and talking about writing. Obviously I would ask you how your writing is going first, before launching into a lengthy account (complete with hand actions, dramatic hair flicks and eye rolls) about how I am doing creatively. Here’s […]

via If We Were Having Coffee & Talking About Writing… #SundayBlogShare #AmWriting — BlondeWriteMore

How To Get Feedback On Your Writing

Writing Investigations

Most of us write to connect – and one of the best ways of getting connection is through asking people for feedback. Little gremlins can put us off this though. The ‘it’s not perfect yet’ gremlin, and the ‘they might reject me personally’ gremlin tend to have extra-loud voices.

Here are some sites you can get feedback from: scribophile and a list of 39 other places thewritelife.com: find a critique partner I can’t vouch for any of these, but someone whose work I know and like is on Scribophile and found it helpful.

Apps can be useful too, but bear in mind that apps don’t buy books or commission writing. Here’s some suggestions: writing tools

Just finding one or two people who you can share you work with live, is a huge help. Judith Barrow and Thorne Moore are novelists who live locally here. Their writing feedback friendship has developed…

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Novel Writing: What if it’s all for Nothing?

Uninspired Writers

Good morning, creatives and creators. I hope you’ve all had a good week.

Mine started slow and has ended better! In the earlier stages of the week I was having some bad writing days, and some major writer’s doubt. But I’ve tried to be kind to myself, to relax and give myself a break. As such, I’m now back on track.

But one thing was nagging at me, something that I’ve seen many other unpublished writers worrying about to. This awful question, after years of working hard on a project, rewriting, revising, studying; what if it’s all for nothing?

It stems, I think, from a fear of rejection a worry that our works will never be read or appreciated. And with that in mind, I wanted to share some thoughts with you all, including ways to stop that question from taking over.

1. It’s never for nothing
I’ve put…

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